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  • Just what you always wanted Iuv?
    Her cover of Cry me a River is on our Jukebox ( see vid on Mrs T's YouTube channel) and it is really special. Her voice is so expressive and emotional. She is such a lovely lady when you meet her. We went to the listening party for her latest album, Pop Deluxe. There were just 16 of us, and she came round the room chatting as we listened to the album. She served me a sausage roll. Can't imagine Alison ever doing that !

    Anyway. At this weeks gig, she was supported by a delightfully spikey young lady called Emily Capell. Young, fresh great British talent with an attitude about her. Somewhere between Lily Allen and Kate Nash. One to watch out for I think. Had a quick chat with her after the gig with, I suspect, her parents. Perhaps a suitable support act for the next Goldfrapp tour. Must tell Mistress Alison.
    Chalk out these two vids.


    Post edited by Urban_Tribesman at 2016-05-20 20:20:10
    The Moving Finger writes; and, having writ.
    Moves on: nor all thy Piety nor Wit.
    Shall lure it back to cancal half a line,
    Nor all thy Tears wash out a Word of it.
  • Just what you always wanted Iuv?



    Oh, there was more?

    Here in the USA, Tracey Ullman took over the beehive-shagadelic-retro music movement the year after Mari's peekthrough hit. That only lasted a year, but it pulled two hits for her, landed her a spot on MTV, and paved the way for the success of her comedy variety shows.
    If I were dead, could I do this?
  • Try this. Her voice is so warm and soulful. Still is. No auto tune here.
    The Moving Finger writes; and, having writ.
    Moves on: nor all thy Piety nor Wit.
    Shall lure it back to cancal half a line,
    Nor all thy Tears wash out a Word of it.
  • Ren Harvieu and Romeo Stodart (Magic Numbers) last night at The Stables Milton Keynes. Lovely intimate show. Ren signed the set list for me and both signed my tickets, photo taken too. Good night had by all
  • Has anybody else read about the Abba Reunion 2016? I've looked on YouTube etc but nothing relates to the story I read yesterday about them all actually performing together. If they did I guess I'd have to remortgage the house to get 2 tickets!
  • Ladyhawke at The Haunt in Brighton on 18 June
    PJ Harvey at Eden Project on 27 June with a nice weeks stay in beautiful Cornwall with a fellow Frapper :x
  • "Ladyhawke".  Have you ever seen the movie?  Loved it!
  • Sarah Mclachlan at Ottawa JazzFest on June 25th! Could not be more excited - here's hoping her setlist remains the same as last year. If I don't hear Possession, Fear or Witness... gah! Can't bear to think about it. 
    My mother is coming down for my graduation at that time, so obviously I have to surprise her with a show by her favourite artist! Heehee.

    *rubs hands enthusiastically*

  • We are off to see Bill Bailey on Friday ( UK comedian for anyone 'far away'. His act always involves clever musical interludes as he is an accomplished musician.
    The Moving Finger writes; and, having writ.
    Moves on: nor all thy Piety nor Wit.
    Shall lure it back to cancal half a line,
    Nor all thy Tears wash out a Word of it.
  • I'm psyched for you, Slippage.  One of my favorites.  Her 9/11 song is just tremendous (and, of course, tons of others).  So, you're right coast... sorta.  I just love Montreal.  Errr, actually, it's been so long since I've been there (god, it could be 40 years!  Not sure, might have gone there for work later) that's misleading.  But, I would bet that what I liked the most hasn't changed much, since Canadian's are pretty rational.  40 years ago or so, a beautiful woman could walk down a dark alley at 4am without a worry in the world.  Kinda like Japan, actually, in that respect.  It's kinda weird that the U.S. is more like a damn war zone.  I keep threatening to move to Canada.  The Ottawa Jazz Fest is not the same as the Montreal Jazz Fest is it?
  • I'm psyched for you, Slippage.  One of my favorites.  Her 9/11 song is just tremendous (and, of course, tons of others).  So, you're right coast... sorta.  I just love Montreal.  Errr, actually, it's been so long since I've been there (god, it could be 40 years!  Not sure, might have gone there for work later) that's misleading.  But, I would bet that what I liked the most hasn't changed much, since Canadian's are pretty rational.  40 years ago or so, a beautiful woman could walk down a dark alley at 4am without a worry in the world.  Kinda like Japan, actually, in that respect.  It's kinda weird that the U.S. is more like a damn war zone.  I keep threatening to move to Canada.  The Ottawa Jazz Fest is not the same as the Montreal Jazz Fest is it?



    Not sure about Montreal Jazz Fest as we've never been, but it could be under the same company. 
    Ottawa is such a fantastic place for concert-goers, artists and old souls. It's brilliant. I'll never forget being front row for BJORK at Ottawa Bluesfest in 2013. She performed Pagan Poetry and stared right into my eyes. It was... just, I can't even describe it. That memory will follow me to the grave for certain.

    Japan is actually somewhere I really have a deep love for, ironically. I aim to visit for a month and see the opening ceremonies of the 2020 Olympics if possible - but again, finances. If I could live there and learn Japanese, I would. It just seems so much less deceitful and selfish as North America (and believe me, we get some real twats up here too!). That being said, I suppose one makes the most of where they are. It is true, though, that Canada is infinitely safer, more inviting and just plain kindhearted as opposed to the U.S. Again, just my two cents. Hope nobody's offended! You wouldn't regret moving here if you did, but I'd suggest Vancouver or Ottawa more than Toronto or anywhere in the Prairies, really.
    Post edited by Slippage at 2016-06-17 22:25:46
  • Japan's culture is staggering.  I've got so many stories.  It's funny, though, that I am always more attracted to Europe.  I guess one thing is that You change boundaries and, bam, you're in a totally different world.  It's fascinating.  Anyways, a few stories of Japan.  The culture really had some amazing characteristics.  Basically, they really believe in self-respect, "saving face" if you will.  Some of the familiar stories about Japan, if you really think about them are staggering.  Like the Hara Kiri.  They are willing to prove their innocence by cutting their guts open.  Or, in old Japan, when people got so old that they were no longer useful to society, they would just go up into the mountains to a place that was set up for it to die.  I know, to most westerners, that sounds horrific but the dedication to honor to such an extent, while maybe over the top, is worth thinking about.  I think it's awesome.  Without self-respect, what are any of us?  Okay, better stories but in a similar vein.  At the 7-11's and other convenience shops that sell bento boxes and such, the expiration in like in a couple of hours.  So, all the homeless people get an excellent meal anytime they want it.  Which is what western people just don't seem to get.  A lot of people in the U.S. believe that, if you're in the gutter, somehow you are reveling in it.  That you really have this intent with your life that you want to be at the bottom of society.  Japan offers them some degree of respect.  Another one that blew me away was that a lot of the homeless people that I would see in the gutters would have this stack of newspapers, which seemed curious to me.  Someone explained that they were professors and such that were just making a statement as to the homeless.What?  20 years ago, you would see transvestites and such on their game and talk shows.  Tokyo!  Pretty fascinating.  Shinjuku station, which I took every day, had more people pass through it daily then live in the state of Maine, about a million people a day.  The Tokyo government building towers had more people working in it (~ 85,000) than live in Portland, Maine.

    I don't know.  I guess I just like beautiful cities and none of the cities I visited in Asia (I did not go to Kyoto, which should be lovely.  Did you know that Kyoto (kyo and to) has the same meaning as Tokyo (kyo and to, again)?  It means something like eastern capital or some such.  Kyoto was the first and Tokyo usurped the title.  The ones that really blow me away are the people from Osaka.  They are more capitalistic than Americans.

    Errr, why no mention of Montreal?  I agree about Toronto.  It seems more American than Canadian.  You know, what I noticed, and I swear it was as soon as we crossed the border, it's like the pace of life dropped about 10 decibels.  It just wasn't frenetic like the U.S.  Yeah, I'm sure I'd like it.
  • Japan's culture is staggering.  I've got so many stories.  It's funny, though, that I am always more attracted to Europe.  I guess one thing is that You change boundaries and, bam, you're in a totally different world.  It's fascinating.  Anyways, a few stories of Japan.  The culture really had some amazing characteristics.  Basically, they really believe in self-respect, "saving face" if you will.  Some of the familiar stories about Japan, if you really think about them are staggering.  Like the Hara Kiri.  They are willing to prove their innocence by cutting their guts open.  Or, in old Japan, when people got so old that they were no longer useful to society, they would just go up into the mountains to a place that was set up for it to die.  I know, to most westerners, that sounds horrific but the dedication to honor to such an extent, while maybe over the top, is worth thinking about.  I think it's awesome.  Without self-respect, what are any of us?  Okay, better stories but in a similar vein.  At the 7-11's and other convenience shops that sell bento boxes and such, the expiration in like in a couple of hours.  So, all the homeless people get an excellent meal anytime they want it.  Which is what western people just don't seem to get.  A lot of people in the U.S. believe that, if you're in the gutter, somehow you are reveling in it.  That you really have this intent with your life that you want to be at the bottom of society.  Japan offers them some degree of respect.  Another one that blew me away was that a lot of the homeless people that I would see in the gutters would have this stack of newspapers, which seemed curious to me.  Someone explained that they were professors and such that were just making a statement as to the homeless.What?  20 years ago, you would see transvestites and such on their game and talk shows.  Tokyo!  Pretty fascinating.  Shinjuku station, which I took every day, had more people pass through it daily then live in the state of Maine, about a million people a day.  The Tokyo government building towers had more people working in it (~ 85,000) than live in Portland, Maine.


    I don't know.  I guess I just like beautiful cities and none of the cities I visited in Asia (I did not go to Kyoto, which should be lovely.  Did you know that Kyoto (kyo and to) has the same meaning as Tokyo (kyo and to, again)?  It means something like eastern capital or some such.  Kyoto was the first and Tokyo usurped the title.  The ones that really blow me away are the people from Osaka.  They are more capitalistic than Americans.

    Errr, why no mention of Montreal?  I agree about Toronto.  It seems more American than Canadian.  You know, what I noticed, and I swear it was as soon as we crossed the border, it's like the pace of life dropped about 10 decibels.  It just wasn't frenetic like the U.S.  Yeah, I'm sure I'd like it.


    I have to admit, I find Montreal too darn insane. Not prejudiced against the Quebecers in any way, but I find them generally too frantic, easily offended and quick to react. It makes for a hectic, tension-riddled atmosphere. Everything moves either at 1 or 100 in Quebec. There's just no in-between! I only go to Montreal for concerts or their wonderful Bio-Dome now (their art, theatre and music culture is fantastic). Never been to the States, but I'd envision Montreal as being similar to L.A, Miami or a city with that kind of frantic hustle to it.
    But yeah, Canada is far more reserved, peaceful and less sensitive. We don't take jokes as insults and typically don't act on assumption. The corporations, religions and celebrity idolization is what controls the U.S right now I feel (no offense!!!), and countless other people here tend to agree. It just gives off a plastic atmosphere.

    Then again, Canadian television is the equivalent of watching endless loops of commercials for household cleaners and really cringeworthy ads. What I'd give to be able to tune in on something other than the news with our rabbit ears (screw the prices for satellite and cable). Maybe you guys in the U.S get the better deal! ;)

    Also, while on the subject of pop culture influence, we profusely apologize for Justin Bieber. Kids have enough imbeciles and brainwashed fools to "idolize" in the world! 
    Post edited by Slippage at 2016-06-20 13:56:12
  • No, no, don't apologize.  I appreciate insights from different cultures.  Actually, your insights align with mine quite well.  Except, I have to say the banks seem to be running the show in the U.S.  The latest one that is blowing my mind is that they are supposedly (read it on the internet. ha!)are charging companies and additional 5% for using the chip cards that they are now required to use! That's on top of 3% that they charge for just using a card (hmmm, maybe it's 5% total.  8% seems too crazy, even for the U.S.).  I'm surprised that stores don't start using two prices.  One for cash and one for cards or a blanket 5 or 8% off of a purchase with cash.

    Personally, I use DVD.  I don't ever watch tv on purpose.  If I see it accidentally, I am appalled at the commercials/brainwashing.  That's not even mentioning the brainwashing of the shows.  And, you know, you could probably get the U.S. TV shows on DVD, right?  Netflix?  Personally, I'd rather just pay outright for the show so I can watch it more than once.

    Oh.  I didn't know Justin was Canadian.  My condolences.  Actually, I don't know enough to judge but....

    40 years ago (god, that's a long time!), the U.S. was amplified about 1,000 times over Montreal and that's not even the big cities.  So, Ottawa is a lot slower pace than Quebec province or Montreal?  Interesting.  Ottawa was very nice when I visited, also.  Quebec city seemed like a glacial pace compared to the U.S. and that was somewhat recently.  I went there for the "Winter Carnival" a decade or two ago (Ha!  That's scary.  I think in terms of a few decades as "recent now"!  Sheesh!).

    I found that in Quebec city they were crazy sensitive about their language and I can't blame them.  I think it's a beautiful language and I'd love to speak it well.  Telling them that usually would make them more amenable.  The thing that should really piss them off is that, even though the are the 2nd place international language, the U.S. usually displays things in Spanish and English.  Really, though, there are just so many Spanish speakers in the U.S. it just makes sense.  I had a guy in Paris tell me that he thought English speakers were just lazy for not learning other languages.  Ha!  My cohort, Bill, just about jumped over the conference table at them.  I had to explain that it's just damn difficult when everyone either speaks one's own language or wants to speak one's own language.  It drives me crazy.  It was quite an amusing lunch, really.  They served a fine meal of fish.  It just wasn't Bill's day (actually, his whole trip was like that).  While he fishes all of the time, he hates eating fish.

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