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Words & Phrases
  • Apologies if this is a repeat discussion but have you tried searching all the pages on 3G! Thought we could re-invigorate our language a bit by bringing back some of those words and phrases long (or not so long) forgotten. Here's my openers

    'Shenanigans' she·nan·i·gan - mischievous or deceitful trick, practice

    'Merkin' - a pubic wig - could be more prevalent in the future what with laser hair removal - ref Cameron Diaz on the Graham Norton show last week!
    Post edited by Appy61 at 2014-04-15 02:20:56
    What if the Hokey Cokey is what it's all about?
  • 110 Comments sorted by
  • I love this it's brilliant!


    image
    What if the Hokey Cokey is what it's all about?
  • Hey, if we can agree a package of new words/old words to reintroduce to our already colourful language, we could then play post bingo. Every word is given a points score and the first to 50 points by including the words as unobtrusively as possible in their posts is the winner.


    I would like to reintroduce Bounder: An ill bred, moraly reprehensible and unscrupulous man. A Cad.


    Cad (obviously) : Regency-era swear word, meaning a man who doesn't treat women proper. Used thus:


    Regency woman: Forsooth, Eminem, for thou art such a cad!

    Eminem: Yo, shut yo mouth yo beeatch, and suck mah cock, and den yall fuck off back to yo own time zone
    Regency woman: (faints at hearing so much bad language)

    They were obviously Cads at your concert the other night Hells, probably Bounders as well.

    I would only rate Shenanigans, Bounder and Cad as worthy of one point but Merkin has to be a 3 !

    Remember, it has to blend in, not just shoehorned into posts for the sake of points (which in this case, will not make prizes)

     

    The Moving Finger writes; and, having writ.
    Moves on: nor all thy Piety nor Wit.
    Shall lure it back to cancal half a line,
    Nor all thy Tears wash out a Word of it.
  • OMG he's off on another tangent - I have released the monster yet again!
    What if the Hokey Cokey is what it's all about?
  • Ohhh, I like this!  I'm sure I can think of some, but I think I'll skip the contest.

    First thing that popped in my mind is the Beatles.  And, then, I thought that won't work.  But, really, it does.  I've met way too many people that haven't a clue who they were.  By the way, Beatles: British band that took the world by storm.
    Post edited by Whickwithy at 2014-04-15 15:18:15
  • Frippery :
    1: showy or unnecessary ornamentation in architecture, dress, or language.
    2: flashy guitar 'shenanigans' from seated, bespectacled lead guitarist of King Crimson. Also known to another fan base as 'Mr Toyah'

    Geezer:
    1: A guy, a bloke, a person in general. The British equivalent of the American slang word "dude". Especially a local man of some repute: To the Romans, Jesus was a 'Geezer'. Thus:
    1st Roman soldier. 'Who's that geezer over there kicking over the money lenders tables?
    2nd Roman soldier. 'Oh, that's Jesus of Nazereth.
    2: bass player with Black Sabbath. Born Terence Michael Joseph Butler.

    Frippery. 2 points
    Geezer. 1 point.
    The Moving Finger writes; and, having writ.
    Moves on: nor all thy Piety nor Wit.
    Shall lure it back to cancal half a line,
    Nor all thy Tears wash out a Word of it.
  • Geezer in Engish American means a very,very old man.  Give yourself another point.
  • Supercallifragilisticexpialidocious (sp?)

    Okay, did the google thang"

    Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious


    Darned close!
    Post edited by Whickwithy at 2014-04-15 15:35:53
  • Spiffy

    Smart in appearance or dress; stylish.
  • Spiffy

    Smart in appearance or dress; stylish.


    Is this similar to the British 'Stiffy' meaning arousal or tumescence in the lower centre part of the body? Generally male bodies but I have seen some videos......
    The Moving Finger writes; and, having writ.
    Moves on: nor all thy Piety nor Wit.
    Shall lure it back to cancal half a line,
    Nor all thy Tears wash out a Word of it.
  • Have looked up 'Spiffy' and your etymology is sound WW. It also means unique and amusing and can be a substitute for cool. I recommend visiting urbandictionary.com as it is full of interesting explanations.
    Spiffing is another British word meaning top notch as in 'she's a spiffing young filly'!
    Filly is a 'Bounders' (1 point) slang term for young girl.
    We could be here all night! 1 point for all these but 2 for Spiffy on its own.
    The Moving Finger writes; and, having writ.
    Moves on: nor all thy Piety nor Wit.
    Shall lure it back to cancal half a line,
    Nor all thy Tears wash out a Word of it.
  • Actually, in some languages, multiple negating words (I hesitate to use the word particles) are required as a type of parallelism. Though it is typically frowned upon in English, double (quadruple, etc.) negation does not necessarily form an affirmative in most of its natural dialects. Because it is unnecessary, however, it sounds rather coarse, to say the least.
    Post edited by iuventus at 2014-04-15 18:22:21
    I'm so cold!
  • Although uncommon in English, there are examples of triple and quadruple negatives in Shakespeare and the writings of Chaucer. However, I believe Sheldon demonstrates the quadruple negative best in 'The Flaming Spittoon Acquisition' episode of The Big Bang Theory, when he eventually asks Amy to be his girlfriend, 'I would not object to us no longer characterizing you as not my girlfriend'.
    A real life quadruple negative, and it doesn't sound course at all!
    The Moving Finger writes; and, having writ.
    Moves on: nor all thy Piety nor Wit.
    Shall lure it back to cancal half a line,
    Nor all thy Tears wash out a Word of it.

  • A real life quadruple negative, and it doesn't sound course at all!



    That's an example of triple negation, and Sheldon uses it to exemplify the prescriptive rule of multiple negation in a particularly erudite fashion. The type of multiple negation people tend to scoff at is that which does not intend to exploit that very rule for elevated humor or wit.

    It's not particularly helpful to compare Elizabethan English to 21st Century Modern English with hope of polishing one's own generic grammar skills or of correcting or defending one's dialect or idiolect. Not only are many of our presumptions about Shakespeare's intention...well, presumptuous, but the language, itself, has evolved--for better or worse--too far to use Early Modern English as an appropriate model. Also, Shakespeare's English was a particularly affected example of the written language--though it was, indeed, meant to be heard rather than read.
    Post edited by iuventus at 2014-04-15 20:03:31
    I'm so cold!
  • ...and now for some American slang. "Turn up"- it means to start partying. Apparently it means you're going to get a little loud and wild...."we gon turn up in dis mutha fucka", etc.
    When you're ready, you may turn around and face me
  • I thought it was "turn this motherfucker out."
    I'm so cold!

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