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  • Omg, just realized Wonder Girl was Debra Winger- 


    U R I E L
    Middle of the Tree. Directing the souls.
  • More Selina Kyle (Catwoman) Pet. I saw one in your earlier picture of the set of books.
    She has been drawn as a sexy woman throughout her tenure in the comics. Her and Batman have had a love/hate relationship forever and the Cat and the Bat sould have had Battlings years ago.
    The Moving Finger writes; and, having writ.
    Moves on: nor all thy Piety nor Wit.
    Shall lure it back to cancal half a line,
    Nor all thy Tears wash out a Word of it.
  • Here especially for iuventus is Captain Loyal all tied up.  The next best thing, maybe, to Steve Trevor.

    image
    Post edited by Pet at 2015-03-26 20:50:38
  • More Selina Kyle (Catwoman) Pet. I saw one in your earlier picture of the set of books.
    She has been drawn as a sexy woman throughout her tenure in the comics. Her and Batman have had a love/hate relationship forever and the Cat and the Bat sould have had Battlings years ago.



    There's no Catwoman, I'm afraid, amongst the books.  (Though a Catwoman book would be a fine thing.)  Perhaps you're thinking of Miss Fury (who is someone else entirely):

    image
  • Let's say a bit about Supergirl, now.  This is the cover of Superman #123 (August 1958) in which the Girl of Steel (not yet the Maid of Might) first appeared.  On this first appearance, her name was hyphenated as Super-Girl.  Her skirt is red, but when she reappeared the following year it was blue.  On this cover, her hair is dressed in a distinctly adult style, although it looks more youthful inside the comic.

    The story is very odd.  Jimmy Olsen, Superman's pal, has access to an artifact that will, once in a hundred years, grant three wishes.  Unlike the usual rules for such things, wishes can be cancelled without counting as an extra wish.  Jimmy's first wish brings Super-Girl into existence.  Later in the story, he cancels the wish.  Presumably, it was intended that this would be Super-Girl's only appearance.

    In May of the following year, Supergirl would be back, though (by popular demand, perhaps).  On her next appearance, she has a new (and more plausible) back-story.  Rather than magicked into existence, she is now Superman's cousin shot into space from the doomed planet Krypton.  Her hyphen has vanished, never to be restored, and her skirt has turned blue (but eventually we would see the red skirt again).

    Her costume seems less practical than Wonder Woman's culottes (or hot pants in the TV series).  In that short skirt, it's hard to see how she avoids displaying next day's super laundry.  Perhaps this relies on a super power that's never mentioned.  I wonder whether Superman shares this mysterious power.  If he wore a skirt, would he flash his underwear?

    Also, the high heels seen on this cover, and inside the comic, would not make it through to her second appearance.

    image
    Post edited by Pet at 2015-03-27 07:09:20
  • Here's Super-Girl's softer hair style from the interior of Superman #123.

    image
  • Returning to Wonder Woman for a moment, in these panels we see a bit of spanking as well as the more usual bondage.  Chained by the neck to a radiator is also, I think, an interesting addition to the frequently kinky images found in the early Wonder Woman.

    image
  • Wow, Miss Fury does look like Catwoman. Hubba !
    The Moving Finger writes; and, having writ.
    Moves on: nor all thy Piety nor Wit.
    Shall lure it back to cancal half a line,
    Nor all thy Tears wash out a Word of it.
  • Wow, Miss Fury does look like Catwoman. Hubba !



    Miss Fury (originally called Black Fury) was a Sunday newspaper comic, rather than a comic book.  In those days, newspaper comics carried more cachet than comic books.  It was the work of (June) Tarpe Mills (there should be an accent on the 'e' of 'Tarpe', but I don't know how to do that on an Internet forum).  I put 'June' in brackets as she didn't use her first name in signing comics.

    Catwoman made her first appearance in 1940.  Miss Fury first appeared in 1941.  One might think, on that basis, that Miss Fury was based on Catwoman, but not so.  When Catwoman first appeared, she had no costume (that is to say that she wore ordinary clothes, not that she appeared naked).  By the time Catwoman got her catsuit, the Miss Fury strip (1941-49) had long since passed into history.  My feeling is that what we now consider Catwoman's iconic look was lifted from Miss Fury -- probably consciously lifted unless the person or people responsible knew little of comics history.

    Below are the first two Black (Miss) Fury pages from April 6th and 13th 1941.

    image
  • What I find interesting Pet is how similar the characters look in 1940 when Bob Kane came up with 'The Cat' and then in 1941 when Black Fury appears. Below is the first appearance of Catwoman ( as the Cat) in Batman #1 in 1940. Look how similarly they are drawn and at their hairstyle in particular. I would say these two characters were borrowing from each other to be honest, being developed at almost the same time.
    On a similar issue, do you remember a character from a British comic of the 1960's called Billy Fury? He also dressed as a cat from memory.

    image
    The Moving Finger writes; and, having writ.
    Moves on: nor all thy Piety nor Wit.
    Shall lure it back to cancal half a line,
    Nor all thy Tears wash out a Word of it.
  • @Pet
    I think this page sums it up nicely Pet. Thanks for the Miss Fury heads up. Had never heard of her before.
    http://everydayislikewednesday.blogspot.co.uk/2012/04/quick-question-for-any-catwoman.html
    The Moving Finger writes; and, having writ.
    Moves on: nor all thy Piety nor Wit.
    Shall lure it back to cancal half a line,
    Nor all thy Tears wash out a Word of it.
  • ^Yes, I think it does.

    I think that the similarities between the 1940 Batman page and the 1941 Miss Fury pages have to do with the styles of the time -- styles of comic book drawing, fashionable hair styles, etc.  Compare with these August 1941 Phantom Lady pages:

    image
  • Oh, and the British comic character you were thinking of is Billy the Cat from the Beano.


    Billy Fury was a pop singer:

  • Yep, that's him, Billy the Cat. (No Fury !)
    The Moving Finger writes; and, having writ.
    Moves on: nor all thy Piety nor Wit.
    Shall lure it back to cancal half a line,
    Nor all thy Tears wash out a Word of it.

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