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  • @Kat "That's beautiful Ponygurl. Have you ever been published?"


    No, I haven't..but I really enjoy your art as well. As of now, my artistic expression has only been shared amongst friends. I love writing though, I find it very cathartic. Poems are easy, because they're short and to the point. I actually started a novel years ago, but have yet to finish (kinda like alot of creative projects i engage in. Aries nature.) I would love to be published someday though..it would make all the energy put forth worth it. Btw, how's the Sex Ed book coming? Is it completed? Is there a section for gay sex? Just curious :D
    Post edited by Ponygurl at 2017-05-11 21:11:44
    U R I E L
  • Yeah, the book got finished and its sitting on someone's desk at a publishing house....I'm waiting,waiting...
    Doubt if it'll ever get published. It's not what anyone here would think is an interesting read! It's planning and assessment tools for the subject, and yes, lessons re sexuality are definitely factored in.
    In fact I taught two lessons today on that subject and was trying to draw an opinion from the pupils as to whether they think homosexuality is genetic or a lifestyle " choice" / nurture- driven.
    Watching some vox-pop type video clips with them, it's shocking to hear how many people really believe that it's a lifestyle choice, but happily, the kids I teach didn't seem to think so.
    As I pointed out to them, would a man in the 50s have chosen to be gay knowing that being " caught" would be punishable by death?
    Would a woman in 1950s Germany have chosen to be " antisocial", remembering what happened to lesbians under the Nazis?
    It never fails to amaze me how ignorant some people in our generation can still be, as if they've had their thinking brains cauterised. Tsk.
  • PS, more poems would be very welcome and thanks for the compliment! As I'm leaving my job very shortly I may even get time to pursue my own hobbies for a few weeks!
  • Pps, I'm Raurus but def have that Aries thing going on too...always starting something then flitting to something else. I keep telling myself that one day I'll tie up all the loose ends!
    With a realistic head on at last, I am starting to gather ideas for a new work of fiction but I know it may only ever get drafted when I'm in retirement! That's another twenty odd years of ideas gathering to go! Epic!
  • KatRobin said:

    Yeah, the book got finished and its sitting on someone's desk at a publishing house....I'm waiting,waiting...
    Doubt if it'll ever get published. It's not what anyone here would think is an interesting read! It's planning and assessment tools for the subject, and yes, lessons re sexuality are definitely factored in.
    In fact I taught two lessons today on that subject and was trying to draw an opinion from the pupils as to whether they think homosexuality is genetic or a lifestyle " choice" / nurture- driven.
    Watching some vox-pop type video clips with them, it's shocking to hear how many people really believe that it's a lifestyle choice, but happily, the kids I teach didn't seem to think so.
    As I pointed out to them, would a man in the 50s have chosen to be gay knowing that being " caught" would be punishable by death?
    Would a woman in 1950s Germany have chosen to be " antisocial", remembering what happened to lesbians under the Nazis?
    It never fails to amaze me how ignorant some people in our generation can still be, as if they've had their thinking brains cauterised. Tsk.





    Hmm, I love this topic..it's so interesting to me. I think it's a combo of genetics and experience. I've always been drawn towards other girls, except when I went through puberty. It's strange but if I'm being honest, I was bisexual then. Then at age 13, I escaped a rape attempt. It killed any kind of sexual thought towards males. It's funny, but I can see it in pictures of myself then. I completely stopped wearing skirts and dresses (I was wearing a skirt when it happened) and started dressing like a boy! Only now I can look back at it and see it was form of self protection. I was later disowned by my father for being gay! Needless to say, I have a great hatred for the Patriarchy. It's stone-age thinking and a means of social control.
    U R I E L
  • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q_9zxh4prBQ


    There's a certain Slant of light


    BY EMILY DICKINSON




    There's a certain Slant of light, 


    Winter Afternoons – 


    That oppresses, like the Heft 


    Of Cathedral Tunes – 




    Heavenly Hurt, it gives us – 


    We can find no scar, 


    But internal difference – 


    Where the Meanings, are – 




    None may teach it – Any – 


    'Tis the seal Despair – 


    An imperial affliction 


    Sent us of the Air – 




    When it comes, the Landscape listens – 


    Shadows – hold their breath – 


    When it goes, 'tis like the Distance 


    On the look of Death –

    Post edited by lukasgardiner at 2017-05-12 15:52:25
  • I saw this tonight on an edition of Elementary.

    Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening
    BY ROBERT FROST

    Whose woods these are I think I know.
    His house is in the village though;
    He will not see me stopping here
    To watch his woods fill up with snow.

    My little horse must think it queer
    To stop without a farmhouse near
    Between the woods and frozen lake
    The darkest evening of the year.

    He gives his harness bells a shake
    To ask if there is some mistake.
    The only other sound’s the sweep
    Of easy wind and downy flake.

    The woods are lovely, dark and deep,
    But I have promises to keep,
    And miles to go before I sleep,
    And miles to go before I sleep.
    The Moving Finger writes; and, having writ.
    Moves on: nor all thy Piety nor Wit.
    Shall lure it back to cancal half a line,
    Nor all thy Tears wash out a Word of it.
  • Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening
    BY ROBERT FROST



    Great for teaching some basic literary devices.
    If I were dead, could I do this?
  • It is a far more complicated structure than it first appears. In the first 3 stanzas, the 1st, 2nd & 4th lines rhyme, and the 3rd does not, but the 3rd does rhyme with the 1st, 2nd and 4th of the following stanza, giving the whole work an unusual meter. Then all the lines of the 4th stanza rhyme with each other and with the 3rd line of the preceding one.
    Nice. Never seen this poem before.
    The Moving Finger writes; and, having writ.
    Moves on: nor all thy Piety nor Wit.
    Shall lure it back to cancal half a line,
    Nor all thy Tears wash out a Word of it.
  • Never seen this poem before.



    Really?! In the USA, it's probably one of the most read poems of the 20th Century.
    If I were dead, could I do this?
  • I am guessing Robert Frost was American?
    The Moving Finger writes; and, having writ.
    Moves on: nor all thy Piety nor Wit.
    Shall lure it back to cancal half a line,
    Nor all thy Tears wash out a Word of it.
  • Weirdly enough, as with a great many American poets, he was a North-easterner, along with my own very favorite poet and thinker, Ralph Waldo Emerson.
  • Ran across this while searching for that D.H. Lawrence quote.  Kinda nice

    I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings

    The free bird leaps
    on the back of the wind
    and floats downstream
    till the current ends
    and dips his wings
    in the orange sun rays
    and dares to claim the sky.

    But a bird that stalks
    down his narrow cage
    can seldom see through
    his bars of rage
    his wings are clipped and
    his feet are tied
    so he opens his throat to sing.

    The caged bird sings
    with fearful trill
    of the things unknown
    but longed for still
    and his tune is heard
    on the distant hill for the caged bird
    sings of freedom

    The free bird thinks of another breeze
    and the trade winds soft through the sighing trees
    and the fat worms waiting on a dawn-bright lawn
    and he names the sky his own.

    But a caged bird stands on the grave of dreams
    his shadow shouts on a nightmare scream
    his wings are clipped and his feet are tied
    so he opens his throat to sing

    The caged bird sings
    with a fearful trill
    of things unknown
    but longed for still
    and his tune is heard
    on the distant hill
    for the caged bird
    sings of freedom.

    Maya Angelou
  • Beautiful poetry.
  • Yah.  I have a hard time finding poetry I like and this one popped up out of nowhere.  I also almost agree with what it says.  The only word that throws me is freedom.

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